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August 21, 2019 August 21, 2019

Should politicians pay their own way to political power?

Posted on May 17, 2019 by admin

Political reform is necessary now, rather than later. Southern Albertans are settling in or are begrudgingly accepting a new UCP leadership provincially, as Canadians head to the polls this fall. Alberta’s political system is nauseatingly flawed, as is the federal way of playing politics. Canadians speak of political reform, but Albertans and Canadians seem lazy and complacent when it comes to deciding what’s right or good for the province and country. There needs to be some drastic changes to allow Canada to continue its democratic journey — it is hoped, forward and not backward — when it comes to electing its leaders, both provincially and federally.

In the United States, the country is in dire need of political reform and fast. Both in Canada and in the U.S., political candidates and/or those in power rely on donations and/or sponsorships to fund/continue self-righteous crusades, while keeping war chests full and at the ready. Case in point — the National Rifle Association (NRA) in the U.S. and Big Gas and Oil in Alberta. Right now, the United States is in the middle of a possible civil war, and always has been thanks to the sometimes questionable right for an American to “bear arms.” In Alberta, politicians only seem to care about what Big Gas and Oil thinks and when Big Gas and Oil or the NRA say jump — politicians ask, “how high?“

Here’s an idea for both Americans and Canadians (mostly Albertans) to ponder — quit allowing politicians to pander to businesses, organizations, lobby groups, and so on and so on. Make it against the law for politicians to use any funds raised for campaigns and/or to gain popularity. Non-politicians or civilians have to use their own money to succeed through jobs and/or taking on debt — sometimes, if they are lucky, they may inherit some money. Maybe that’s how it should be in the political arena.

Big business and big organizations gain too much power and dictate how life should be for the masses. It is often a donor’s/sponsor’s hope they can help lift up a politician to tow their line, which is usually part of a political party’s party line (as they are sometimes in bed with big business and big organizations).

Maybe it is time to just say no. No to politicians campaigning or running countries on the backs of the personal agendas of big business and big organizations. Maybe it is time for politicians to quit relying on the generosity or begging of those with an ulterior motive in mind — big and small.

In Alberta, many businesses and/or organizations find it necessary to grease the palms of politicians in hope of something in return and in turn, politicians open up their hands to it. A break in this cycle might be one way political reform could be successful. This perhaps could be one aspect to consider, as political reform helps pave the way for a better political tomorrow.

Taking away the chance of manipulation and making politicians pay their own way could be an alternative to the way politics are played across the country, especially in Alberta. There are four years until the next provincial election. Four years to figure out how to make things better. Political reform should be a priority before it’s too late.

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